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Monday, December 31, 2012

A Satmar Scribe Writes a Temple Torah

Satmar Sofer Rabbi Moshe Eisenbach and his temple patrons
photo credit - NJJN
The New Jersey Jewish News reports that a Sofer (scribe) from Williamsburg has written a Sefer Torah for a Reform Temple. I guess some Satmar Chasidim are more open minded than one would ever believe about them.  Rabbi Moshe Eisenbach has written one knowing it will be used by a Reform Temple. This goes just a wee bit beyond recognizing heterodox movements. Doesn’t it?

Just when you think you know everything there is to know about Satmar and Reform… along comes a story like this and completely throws you for a loop. I’m glad the Satmar Rebbe approves. Apparently. But what Agudah would say?

The Hachnosas Sefer Torah was held on Saturday, December first at a Reform Temple in Edison New Jersey. There was singing and dancing accompanied by the beautiful voice of Cantor Jacqueline Marx (who often play guitar at the service). This Shabbos had additional musicians - a pianist, woodwind player and drummer.  After the hoopla The Torah was read and a beautiful time was had by all.

13 comments:

  1. The article says nothing about the Satmar Rebbe approving or not. It does not even mention that the sofer is a satmar chasid. All it says is that he is Orthodox nothing more nothing less.

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    1. The article says he's from Williamsburg. And he looks very much like a Satmar Chasdid in the picture. But your right... he may not be. But if he is, I don't think a Sofer from Satmar would do anythig the Rebbe didn't approve of... becuase if he did, that would probably be the last Safrus job he would ever have.

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  2. Why is this an issue? Wouldn't you (and satmar, and the agudah) prefer that all sifrei Torah in circulation are k'sheirim? Wouldn't it be worse to enable a "non-approved" sefer to go to this congregation . . . Which after a couple of generations and poor keeping of provenance records, might accidentally find its way to an Orthodox congregation?

    I think it's one of those situations of doing things to limit trouble with mamzeirim down the road . . .

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    1. Could be... Just seems strange for a Chasidhe looking guy to be writing a Sefer Torah for a Reform Shul. Not sure what the Halachic issues are.

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  3. Yes, it comes dangerously close to an admission that a Reform congregation is a Jewish congregation and a Reform synagogue is a Jewish synagogue. But the real surprise would be a Reform sofer writing a Sefer Torah for a Satmar shul. :)

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  4. I know the guy. Not that it makes any difference, but he is not a “Satmar” Chasid.

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    1. Like you said... Not that it makes any difference.

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    2. Well to me it doesn’t. To you it obviously does, as you never waste an opportunity to bash Satmar.

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  5. Actually I never waste an opportunity to bash people who make a Chilul HaShem. Satmar happens to fit that category a lot lately. Nothing against any individual Satmar Chasdim. Nor their Hashkafos or Hanhagos. Said so many times.

    I have to give you credit though. You actually read both of my blogs. Kol HaKavod. :)

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  6. Eisenbach is a famous yerushalmi name. Harry- this is basic 101. I would think you are more astute than to assume any white beard in Williamsburg means Satmar! You sound like a NYT reporter!

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  7. I always wondered where Sifrei Torahs for Conservative shuls and Reform temples come from.

    From the photo and the write-up, nothing about the person's background is revealed, except that he is an orthodox scribe.

    I theorized that it may be that certain letters are missing from the Sefer Torah, thereby rendering it someone possul from halachic standards, which could be how they end up in non-orthodox environments.

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